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How do SSD claims and appeals work?

| Mar 11, 2021 | Social Security Disability and Appeals |

When they are unable to work, costs may pile up for Washington residents. Various injuries or illnesses might lead to their predicament, and the recovery time could be far off. Social Security Disability insurance provides an option for those needing the funds. However, the bar to prove disability status remains high and initial denials occur. An appeal process could work in favor of someone experiencing an initial rejection.

Proving the disability to the SSA

The Social Security Administration must follow regulations and rules regarding any application approvals. First, the applicant must reach the bar set by the definition of a disability. A severe disability that leads someone to be unable to work any job could qualify. Of course, the SSA demands credible proof of the claims. Medical records may partially satisfy the SSA during the review process.

Although the applicant may feel he or she submitted a viable application, a denial may follow the submission. Unless reversed by an appeal, the denial likely stands.

Following through with the appeals process

Submitting an appeal and supporting documentation to the SSA is not challenging. Taking steps to provide the necessary compelling evidence, evidence capable of securing the denial’s reversal, might be another matter. Perhaps the appeal requires more precise and more compelling medical records. The applicant might not know how to put such an appeal together, potentially leading to another unfavorable result.

There are several appeal levels, ranging from a reconsideration to a hearing by an administrative law judge or even in federal court. For some, hiring an attorney may prove unavoidable. Dealing with a hearing before a judge likely requires experience.

An attorney could help with claims for Social Security Disability benefits and appeals. Applicants may want to meet with an attorney to learn more about their options.